Cryorig has introduced its low-profile CPU cooling system for small form-factor PCs that can dissipate up to 125 W. Featuring a 47-mm z-height and a 97-mm depth/width, the Cryorig C7 G is among the smallest coolers for higher-end processors available today. To make C7 G's high performance possible, Cryorig had to apply graphene coating on the heatsink.

As owners of SFF PCs demand higher-performance components, cooling designers are creating low-profile coolers rated for TDP levels of 95 W of higher. To maximize efficiency of such devices, manufacturers use copper for heatsinks, many heat pipes, and large fans. Cryorig decided to go one step further and applied graphene coating to the radiator’s fins. Thermal conductivity of graphene is in the range of 3000 - 5000 W/mK at room temperature (according to Graphene-Info), which is considerably higher than thermal conductivity of aluminum (250 W/mK at 25ºC) or copper (401 W/mK at 25ºC), so applying it on the fins could theoretically improve cooling performance.

Just like regular Cryorig’s C7, the model C7 G features four 6-mm heat pipes and a 97-mm PWM fan with 11 curved blades that rotates at a speed of 600 – 2500 RPM producing airflow of up to 40.5 CFM as well as rated for a maximum load noise level of 30 dB(A).

As far as compatibility is concerned, the Cryorig C7 G cooling system can work with all modern platforms from AMD and Intel, including the latest AM4 and LGA1155 sockets.

The Cryorig C7 G Specifications
  C7-G
CPU TDP 125 W
Material Copper base, graphene covered fins
Dimension with Fan 97 mm (W) × 47 mm (H) × 97 mm (D)
Heat Pipes 4 × 6 mm heat pipes
Air Pressure ~ 1.36 mm H2O
Air Flow (CFM)  40.5 CFM
Speed  600 ~ 2500 RPM
Noise up to 30.2 dBA
Type of Bearing ?
Life Expectancy ?
Weight 673.5 grams
Compatibility AMD AM4/FM2+/FM2/FM1/AM3+/AM3/AM2+/AM2
Intel LGA1151/1150/1155/1156

Cryorig’s C7 G cooler will be available in Japan starting September 28 for ¥9,960 without sales tax ($92.50), which is certainly higher than average for an air cooler. Evidently, graphene coating is expensive and dissipating up to 125 W using a cooling system featuring a 47 mm z-height is a unique capability, so the price can be justified. The unit is already listed on the company’s website, so its launch in other countries is imminent.

Related Reading:

Source: Cryorig (via Hermitage Akihabara)

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  • keyserr - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    I use a HB pencil on all my heatsinks. Reply
  • Hul8 - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    That's graphite. Reply
  • boozed - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    That's the joke Reply
  • Lord of the Bored - Friday, September 27, 2019 - link

    Ironically, peeling sticky tape off graphite is a valid production method for small quantities of graphene, so he's halfway there!

    There's truth in jest, or so they say.
    Reply
  • Operandi - Friday, September 27, 2019 - link

    I think thats how they actually discovered it if I'm not mistaken. Reply
  • kulareddy - Friday, September 27, 2019 - link

    Crayons would work better imo. Reply
  • mikato - Friday, September 27, 2019 - link

    I use a graphene crayon on mine. Reply
  • Kilnk - Sunday, November 10, 2019 - link

    Noctua performs worse than the C7 cu/C7G lmao what are you even talking about? Reply
  • boozed - Thursday, September 26, 2019 - link

    I prefer my heatsinks to be soaked in good old fashioned snake oil Reply
  • GreenReaper - Wednesday, October 2, 2019 - link

    This comment wins, right here. Reply

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