One of the other features that was announced for multiple Snapdragon SoCs at the 3G/LTE Summit in Hong Kong was Quick Charge 3.0, which will be supported on the Snapdragon 820, 617, and 430.

The latest iteration of Qualcomm's rapid charging technology, Quick Charge 3.0 is said to enable up to 27% faster charging over QC 2.0 or up to 38% more efficient. Relative to QC 1.0, charge speed doubles. This is done by using an algorithm that Qualcomm calls Intelligent Negotiation for Optimum Voltage, which allows for selection of appropriate voltage for various device states while charging. Rather than a number of fixed voltage settings, QC 3.0 can scale from 3.6 to 20V in 200 mV increments and will work over USB, including new connector designs like USB Type-C as the USB protocol is not the same as physical connector design. QC 3.0 will be available for vendors to implement now, and it’s likely that we’ll see phones with support for this new fast charging standard appear early next year.

Source: Qualcomm

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  • melgross - Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - link

    It's been done. It shortens the life of the battery. This really isn't in question. It eventually destroys the anode.

    Auto manufacturers are very aware of this problem for their electric vehicles. Quick charging, which is a user requirement for cars is a major problem. There are lithium batteries that are designed to minimize this problem, but they are expensive, and no phone manufacturer uses them.

    Tesla uses off the shelf medium priced Panasonic batteries for its cars. I wonder how well they'll hold up, as I've been reading of some problems in that area.
    Reply
  • id4andrei - Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - link

    From Semi On, the Qualcomm Product Manager answering question in the thread:

    "We do actually include some new tech in QC3 for extending battery cycle life, but the really important part is what the battery is designed and rated for. If it's rated at 1C or 1.5C or 2C, that means they are guaranteeing full cycle life at that power level. The handset manufacturer programs that current level into our charger and we adjust on the fly to provide it given a bunch of variables. It will never deliver more than what the handset has programmed in based on the battery's capability."

    No, it does not shorten the life of the battery. Qualcomm engineers are not stupid to do this.
    Reply
  • melgross - Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - link

    Yeah, it actually does. Remember Qualcomm came out with the 810 chip. Not everything they do is great. Reply
  • jospoortvliet - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    Of course it shortens battery life, but it isn't so bad if you do it right: keep temperature in check and trickle charge the last 20%. Reply
  • III-V - Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - link

    Until you provide a source for your claims -- no, they do not. A lot of people would be interested in reading such a view. Reply
  • lilmoe - Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - link

    "and will work over USB, including new connector designs like USB Type-C as the USB protocol is not the same as physical connector design"

    I find this a big confusing. Did the previous QC 2.0 have a limitation on the physical connector? I thought it was only misinformation...
    Reply
  • neo_1221 - Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - link

    It's not worded very well, but I think he's just emphasizing that the connector doesn't matter - it's all the same USB protocol. Reply
  • Morawka - Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - link

    hopefully next year will be the year of android with all $400 and up flagship phones using Type C Charging Ports and Custom Designed Kyro CPU cores from qualcomm. Reply
  • hans_ober - Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - link

    Seriously. i remember a test where they checked the expansion of the lg g2 as it charged with different currents.. it was something like almost a 0.5mm expansion as it cycled, although this was less with a slower charger. Reply
  • extide - Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - link

    Yeah sounds about right, I mean that's basic physics. That is always going to happen. Reply

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